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Archive for October, 2019

It’s been a busy year and I’ve seen spending a lot of time in front of my computer. I don’t mind doing that type of work, but I do miss cooking and with that, getting my advanced blog posts ready to publish. In fact, I am nowhere near the advanced the blog posts I should be, in preparation for our yearly sojourn to Arizona. I have four posts ready to go but I should have 10! That makes me nervous because I may not have time to post while we are in Arizona; we have three separate group friends coming down for 5-7 days each! That means a lot of sightseeing and daily adventures and less cooking and recipe developing.

You can definitely see the winter light creeping in.

I modified and made this little recipe because during one coffee break JT mentioned that he would love to have a little biscotti to nibble on while we sit and enjoy our coffees. I like making biscotti because they are easy and are not overly finicky. This recipe came together quickly and more or less in one bowl.

Chocolate Chip and Almond Biscotti

For the original recipe, please click here.

Makes about 20 biscotti but it depends on how thickly you form and cut the logs

Ingredients:

  • 57 g unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 225 g brown sugar
  • 10 mL pure vanilla extract
  • 5 mL almond extract
  • 275 g all-purpose flour
  • 75 g almond flour
  • 20 g baking powder
  • pinch salt
  • 165 g chocolate chips

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350° F.
  2. Cream butter and brown sugar until light and fluffy.
  3. Add the eggs, one at a time and best until entirely incorporated. Add the extracts and beat.
  4. Whisk together the dry ingredients (omit the chocolate chips) and blend into the butter mixture.
  5. Fold in the chocolate chips.
  6. Form into two even logs and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet and flatten slightly. Bake for 30 minutes.
  7. Slice diagonally into 10 slices each and lay flat on the same parchment-line baking sheet and bake again for about 10 minutes or until lightly golden. Cool completely before serving.

Notes:

  • I shaped my logs too wide, next time I shall make them more slender and have twice the number of biscotti.
  • Biscotti store well in an airtight container but if it will take you more than a week to consume, I would freeze them until required. Defrost at room temperature.
  • I didn’t have whole almonds but this would have been lovely having a few whole almonds folded into the batter.

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Why do the cold temperatures always surprise me? I’ve been doing this fall thing for a long time and yet, every year when the temperatures plummet, it’s like a cold, hard, slap in the face! It happens from one day to the next; on Saturday, we are lavishing in the sun, cocktailing on the back deck and enjoying al fresco meals and then on Sunday, we are dawning our socks and woolly sweaters to avoid the chill INSIDE, let alone outside! JT and I are typical Canadians, we are stubborn about admitting that its fall and winter is coming; we delay turning on the furnace at all costs because that would mean defeat, we have acknowledged the cold and succumbed to it! But eventually, we give in. I like to rebel and I generally continue to wear sandals until I can no longer feel my toes. My feet understand they don’t like to be encased in socks and shoes…they were meant to be free in flip flops and sandals!

It was on one such day that I needed a little heat-help in my chilly kitchen that I decided to make scones, and to use up some figs that were leftover from a shoot (what can I say, no one wanted them!), so I came up with this tasty treat. This recipe is very delicate and light. They are best eaten right away with sweet butter but freezing them also works. Use the oven to reheat them, the microwave doesn’t do it justice.

Fresh Fig Scones

A KitchenInspirations Original Recipe

Makes about 10 scones

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1/4 tsp green cardamom, finely grated
  • 1/2 cup unsalted cold butter, cut into small bits
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 160 g fresh figs (chopped)
  • 2-3 tbsp milk or yogurt for brushing the tops.

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400° F.
  2. Combine the dry ingredients in the large bowl of your food processor and pulse to mix.
  3. Add the cold, cubed butter and pulse until it resembles a coarse meal.
  4. Slowly pour in the buttermilk while pulsing until the dough comes together. Remove and pour into a large bowl.
  5. Fold in the chopped figs carefully.
  6. Place largish spoonfuls onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and brush the tops with yogurt. Bake for 15-17 minutes.
  7. Cool for 10 minutes and serve with sweet butter.

The light was still good when I shot them.

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I am always inspired by my favourite blogs, and this recipe is no different. My gourmet chef blogger-friend Stefan, made this wonderful hors d ‘œuvres a few weeks ago and I just had to try them. I made only eight halves because it was just the two of us, so I adjusted the recipe while maintaining the proportions he suggested. I also changed up the bread crumbs with whole wheat panko because that is what I have at home. They were delicious and quite impressive looking! Definitely will make them again soon. They are so easy to make for a large group because you can stuff the shells and hold them in the refrigerator and bake them when required. Thank you Stefan for another tasty treat!

These are tasty, bite-sized morsels.

Stuffed Clams

Makes 8 halves. Please click here for the original recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 8 large clams (about 60 g clam meat)
  • 100 mL dry white wine
  • 10 g butter
  • splash of garlic oil
  • 50 g green bell pepper, finely diced
  • 25 g minced onion
  • 40 g dry chorizo, finely diced
  • 20 g whole wheat panko
  • minced fresh flat-leaf parsley, divided
  • grated cheese

Directions:

  1. Place the cleaned clams in a large pan with a lid and pour the wine over them. Heat covered, until boiling and cook the clams until they have all opened.  Remove the clams as they open and set aside. Pour off the liquid and reserve.
  2. Remove the clams from the shells (reserve the shells) and chop finely.
  3. Add the butter and splash of garlic oil and sauté the bell pepper and onion. Add the chorizo and cook for a minute or until the chorizo renders and colours the onion.
  4. Add the panko and the parsley and stir well. Add a little of the reserved wine and clam juice liquid until the mixture is slightly damp but not soaking wet. Add the clams.
  5. Preheat the oven to 350° F.
  6. Stuff each shell with the clam mixture and top with grated cheese. Bake for about 20 minutes or until the cheese has melted. Serve immediately with slices of lemon and a sprinkle of parsley.

These worked very well with our favourite Italian Pinot Grigio.

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Fig Tarte Tatin

The green grocers in my neighbourhood have fresh figs and they don’t cost and arm and a leg! I love to buy them for this little hors d’œuvres but even when I make a bunch, I have leftover figs! I served the tasty hors d’oœuvres for a friend who came over for a glass of wine. The figs made a lovely snack but 3 days later, I still had 7 leftover! So I decided to make a tarte tatin using a different pastry.

My new friend Stefan of Stefan’s Gourmet Blog recently brought to my attention that the original Tarte Tatin did not incorporate a puff pastry crust! The original pastry is more of a short-crust pastry. Who doesn’t love pastry? And this tart is definitely about the pastry! Stefan developed a short-cut for the short-crust that makes it even flakier (don’t take my word for it, check out the last photo!). And it’s so easy. Just a few steps in the refrigerator and Bob’s your uncle. Check out Stefan’s blog to see his step by step technique.

Figs and walnuts make a great pair.

Fig Tarte Tatin

Click here for the original recipe. Makes 1 tarte about 20 cm in diameter.

Ingredients for the pastry:

  • 200 grams pastry flour, divided
  • 25 g sugar
  • 1 g salt
  • 100 g cold butter, in cubes
  • 1 egg, beaten well, divided

Directions for the pastry:

  1. Combine 130 g of the flour, the sugar, and the salt in the large bowl of your food processor and pulse. Add the cold butter and pulse until it comes together.
  2. Flatten the dough with your hand (make sure the safety is on) and sprinkle the remaining 70 g on top and pulse until it crumbles (should not come together). Transfer the crumbly dough into a bowl.
  3. Pour most of the beaten egg over top of the crumbly mixture and cover; reserve the leftover egg. Refrigerate for about 10 minutes.
  4. With a wooden spoon (not your hands), mix the egg into the dough to form a soft ball (add cold water if necessary, I did not); wrap the ball with plastic wrap, flatten and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Ingredients for the filling:

  • 7-10 small figs
  • 40 g walnut halves
  • 100 g sugar
  • 100 ml water
  • 40 grams unsalted butter
  • 1 g salt

Directions for the filling:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400° F.
  2. Cut the stems off the figs and cut them in half. Set aside.
  3. Combine the sugar and water in a small cast iron pan. Without stirring, cook the sugar until it is amber in colour. Don’t leave its side!
  4. When the sugar has caramelized to a gorgeous amber colour, turn the heat down to low and add the salt, swirling it around to mix. Add the walnuts and coat with the caramel and cook for about one minute. Tuck the figs into the caramel cut-side down in the midst of the walnuts and cook for another minute. Remove the cast iron pan from the heat.
  5. Roll out the cold dough into a slightly larger circle than the pan. Lay the pastry over the top and tuck the edges into the pan. Brush the top of the pastry with the reserved egg.
  6. Bake for 30 minutes or until the pastry is golden on top. Allow the tarte to cool for about 10 minutes and then turn it carefully onto a plate, the caramel will be scorching hot. If the figs don’t settle into the pastry as pretty as they could, move them around until you are satisfied.
  7. Serve warm or at room temperature.

The pastry is meant for a larger pan but I didn’t have enough figs so I had a slightly thicker edge than normal, who’s complaining?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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