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Archive for October, 2020

Fall has snuck into our lives. The air is crisper and the sun peaks out of the clouds on rare occasion. I am beginning to really worry about November; for the last four years, we have Novembered in Arizona, where it’s sunny. Every. Single. Day. November in Toronto is dreary at best, cold, grey and wet. Generally not very pretty. We have decided to postpone any travel plans for the next year or so until this COVID beast works itself out. So we will not be spending the month of November in Arizona. I am concerned.

November is a bear, but so can the odd day in September and October. One such dreary late September afternoon, we decided to watch a movie and I made this popcorn recipe. I did not make the fourteen cups that the original recipe called for, ours worked out to be about half which was too much for the two of us, but should suffice for three or four. To be honest, I’ve never had Ballpark Caramel Corn (but I have been to a couple of ball games). This recipe intrigued me because of the molasses addition which gives the corn a slightly anise-flavour.

This recipe is perfect for movie night or Halloween night. We have decided to heed government advice and not participate in Halloween, so we’ve opted out of decorating our house for the occasion but some people have gone all out. This house is about a 20 minute walk from our place on an adjacent street.

Ball Park Caramel Corn

For the original recipe, please click here.

Serves 2-4

Ingredients:

  • 100 g peanuts
  • 120 g kernels
  • 75 g butter
  • 165 g brown sugar
  • 60 mL molasses
  • 2.5 mL salt
  • Pinch of baking soda

Directions:

  1. Pop the kernels. Preheat the oven to 250° F. Prepare a large baking sheet by spraying with a non-stick spray.
  2. Combine all of the ingredients but the baking soda, popcorn and peanuts in a heavy-bottom pan, mix well.
  3. Heat until it reaches a temperature of 268° F, quickly stir in the baking soda, being careful as it could bubble over. Combine the popped corn and peanuts, mix well. Pour the molasses mixture over the popped corn and peanuts, working quickly to mix the molasses into the corn.
  4. Pour the coated corn and peanuts onto the prepared baking sheet and spread out, it doesn’t have to be in a single layer and clusters are preferred. Bake for 15 minutes, stirring once around 7 minutes.
  5. Allow to cool completely, then break apart into varying cluster sizes. Serve in ballpark popcorn containers.

Notes:

  • The original recipe suggests salted peanuts, we are trying to reduce our salt intake so I used plain peanuts.
  • This is a richer flavoured take on caramel corn, which I find equally as delicious.

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For special occasion desserts, I like to pop over to my long-time blogging-friend Liz, Skinny Chick Can Bake. Liz has the most beautifully presented desserts that I have seen from a home cook. Most of Liz’s recipes are also unfamiliar to me as I grew up in a European household. A dear friend was turning 70 in September and I wanted to make a special dessert to celebrate the occasion and this beauty did not disappoint. It has a lovely banana flavour but the pineapple isn’t flavour-forward other than providing some added moisture. It reminded me of banana bread but it was much moister than the standard quickbread. And that cream cheese frosting is one that dreams are made of.

Hummingbird Cake

For the original recipe, please click here.

Makes one 20 cm cake, about 16 servings

Ingredients for the cake:

  • 400 g flour
  • 300 g sugar
  • 6 g cinnamon
  • 6 g salt
  • 5 baking soda
  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 375 mL vegetable oil
  • 7 vanilla extract
  • 540 g mashed bananas (use ripe bananas)
  • 228 g crushed pineapple, drained (about 1/2 a container)
  • 120 g chopped pecans, toasted for about 5 minutes at 350 degrees

Ingredients for the Frosting:

  • 500 g cream cheese, room temperature
  • 40 g butter, room temperature
  • 10 mL vanilla
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 500 g icing sugar, sifted
  • Pecans, for garnish

Directions:

  1. Begin by preheating the oven to 350° F and prepare three 20 cm round cake pans by lining with parchment paper and spraying with a non-stick spray.
  2. Sift the flour, sugar, cinnamon, salt and baking soda together in a large bowl, set aside.
  3. Combine the eggs, vegetable oil, vanilla, mashed bananas and crushed pineapple and fold into the flour to make a smooth batter. Pour evenly into the three prepared baking pans.
  4. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the centre comes out clean. Allow to cool in the pan on a wire rack.
  5. Meanwhile, cream the cream cheese and butter together until light and fluffy. Add the vanilla and lemon juice and beat well until incorporated. Add the sugar a little at a time, scraping down the sides of the bowl frequently until all of the sugar has been incorporated.
  6. When the cakes are thoroughly cool, cut the dome off the top is there was one. Lay the first cake on a serving platting protected by parchment (in short rectangles so that they are easy to remove). Spread a thin layer of the icing over the first layer, place the next cake on top and spread again, add the final layer to the top. Crumb-coat the entire cake in a thin layer and refrigerate for 2 hours to set. When the frosting is firm, finish the cake with the remaining frosting or as desired.
  7. Decorate the cake with more pecans that have been toasted.

Notes:

  • Although the cake has a whopping 300 g of sugar, it is not excessively sweet, it’s the frosting that takes it over the top! I won’t kid you, it is sweet but not as sweet as it was in the original recipe.
  • I reduced the butter to about one-quarter of the original recipe, it still made a super-rich frosting.
  • Neither our friends nor we like super-sweet desserts so I opted to reduce the sugar from 6 cups to 4 cups in the frosting and added the juice of half a lemon to help cut it even more. The resulting frosting was still sweet but it didn’t make your teeth tingle. If you prefer an even less sweet frosting, I suggest you reduce the cream cheese by one quarter so that you require less the icing sugar thicken it up. As it was, 4 cups of icing sugar to 500 g cream cheese and 40 grams of butter made a light fluffy frosting but it needed refrigeration to keep stiff. It was a hot and humid day when I served this cake and my version of frosting didn’t melt but it wasn’t as stiff as frosting usually is.
  • I baked the three layers in a 20 cm (8-inch) round pans because I did not have 9-inch pans as Liz’s recipe calls for (hence the slightly longer baking time as they turned out somewhat thicker.
  • The original cake had coconut but I omitted it because our friends do not like coconut.

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Some time ago, the wee menu on Facebook on my iPhone changed to include videos and a whole bunch of other garbage I wasn’t interested in. I figured out a way to customize it but I left in the videos because it made me look at suggested videos on my feed which was advantageous because I would have never come across Nigella Lawson’s recipe for Kedgeree. The ingredients and origin of the dish enticed me.

“According to “Larousse Gastronomique”, what we call kedgeree originated from a concoction of spiced lentils, rice, fried onions and ginger known as khichiri dating back to the 14th century and eaten across India. The early colonists developed a taste for it, as it reminded them of nursery food” (from The Economist, please click here for the link).

Nigella’s version was made with rice and some simple spices such as curry. On perusing the internet, I discovered that many recipes did not include curry powder but a variety of spices to make the flavours more interesting. We love cumin, coriander and turmeric so those were my spices of choice. I also found a few recipes to include raisins which brought me right back to Morocco. I thought I’d give the dish a go and it was very successful with the exception that it was a bit dry. I have amended my ingredients to include a little extra chicken stock to give it a bit more wetness, not quite like risotto but just this side of it.

The recipe is full of flavour and works well as a quick weeknight meal.

Kedgeree

A KitchenInspirations Original Recipe

Serves 2

Ingredients:

  • 150 g hot smoked salmon
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, quartered
  • 100 g sweet onions, finely chopped
  • 30 g butter
  • 5 g cumin
  • 5 g coriander
  • 5 g turmeric
  • 130 g basmati rice, rinsed
  • 300 mL chicken stock, plus more for wetness
  • 8 g puréed roasted garlic
  • 10 mL fish sauce
  • 25 g sultana raisins
  • Cilantro, roughly chopped
  • 1 lime, zested and juiced

Directions:

  1. In a medium sauce-pan, sauté the onions in the butter until translucent, add the spices and cook until fragrant. Rinse the rice and strain. Toast the rice with the onions and spices until it’s fairly dry.
  2. Combine the chicken stock with the roasted garlic and fish sauce and add it to the rice cooker, mix in the sautéed onions, rice and raisins and cook as directed by the manufacturer. When cooked, stir in a little additional chicken stock to achieve the desired wetness in the rice.
  3. Flake the salmon and toss it with the cooked rice on a serving platter. Sprinkle with the cilantro and lime zest and juice. Garnish with the hard-boiled eggs. Serve at any temperature you wish.

Notes:

  • This is not an authentic kedgeree recipe, it is my version of several recipes after I discovered this dish on the web.
  • Most recipes use curry powder but I prefer the flavours of cumin, coriander and turmeric in this recipe.
  • As with many Indian foods, this is likely an English bastardization.
  • To make this dish vegetarian, or vegan, use coconut oil instead of butter, vegetable stock instead of chicken and tofu or beans instead of salmon.
  • We grilled our Pacific Salmon on the Big Green Egg which provided enough smoky flavour to the dish. If it’s not enough, add a little smoked paprika to achieve a slightly smokier flavour.
  • It seems that this dish can be eaten at any time at any temperature but we prefer it warm for lunch or dinner.

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In late August we had friends over for a wonderful outdoor dinner and I asked if they wouldn’t mind bringing dessert. I usually like to control the entire event, but summer is a lot more casual and dining al fresco has added more of a casual flavour to our entertaining, so I thought, why not. My friend made these chocolate brownies (with raspberry instead of cherry) from Donna Hay and I must say they were totally swoon-worthy. So rich and chocolatey and the preserves just added a lovely moist texture. I did not have raspberry jam but I did have a good handful of frozen cherries so I popped them into a pan with a drizzle of water and a spoon of sugar and cooked them, then I puréed them with my stick blender and further cooked them down to just less than 125 mL.

Just dollop the preserves on top and swirl a knife through to make this marble-like pattern.

Chocolate-Cherry Brownies

Makes 1 23 cm square pan. Original recipe by Donna Hay

Ingredients:

  • 114 g butter
  • 125 g unsweetened chocolate, finely chopped
  • 3 large eggs
  • 375 g sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 5 mL vanilla extract
  • 125 g all-purpose flour
  • 125 mL cherry preserves

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350° F. Line a 23 cm square pan with parchment and butter or spray with non-stick spray.
  2. Melt the butter and chocolate over low heat.
  3. Whisk together the eggs, sugar, salt and vanilla extract until smooth. Add the flour and stir in.
  4. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Dot with spoonfuls of cherry preserves on top. Run a knife through to make a marbled pattern.
  5. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until an inserted toothpick still has a few moist crumbs attached when extracted. Allow to cool completely in the pan and cut into even squares, I got 16.

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