Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for December, 2022

It’s dinner party and cocktail party season so the team at Kitcheninspirations have been busy making and freezing party food so we are never caught empty handed. The filling for these tasty little bites comes together very quickly and if you don’t have time, store-bought wonton wrappers will do the trick.

Shrimp Gyoza

For original gyoza wrapper recipe, please click here.

Makes 20 gyoza

Ingredients:

  • 120 g AP unbleached flour
  • 65 g water, boiling
  • pinch of salt
  • cornstarch for dusting
  • 5 mL sesame oil
  • 75 g shrimp
  • 2 scallions, finely diced
  • 5 g ginger, finely grated
  • 10 g roasted garlic
  • 20 g carrot, finely grated
  • 10 mL soy sauce
  • 8 g cilantro leaves, finely chopped
  • Butter or grapeseed oil to brown gyoza
  • Sesame seeds and cilantro for garnish

Directions:

  1. Combine flour and salt in a bowl. Add boiling water to the flour and salt mixture slowly to make a dough, turn out to a surface and knead for about 10 minutes until smooth. Wrap the dough in plastic and allow to rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.
  2. Heat the sesame oil in a pan and add the shrimp and stir fry. Stir in the scallions, ginger, roasted garlic, carrot, soy sauce and cook for a minute. Remove from heat and allow to cool thoroughly. When cool, add the cilantro and mix well.
  3. To make the wrappers, roll each sausage out to a manageable thickness and run it through the KitchenAid pasta roller from #1 to #4.
  4. Cut into 7.5 cm (3 inch) rounds. Wet the edges of each round, spoon 5 mL (1 tsp) of the filling into the centre and fold in half and seal the edges. I used a handy pleater like this one to get perfect pleats.
  5. Steam each one for 3-5 minutes. When cooked, melt butter or grapeseed oil in a cast iron pan. Pan-fry each one on one side only so it is golden and crispy. Serve with your choice of dipping sauce.
  6. Freeze uncooked gyoza on a piece of parchment and once frozen add to a ziplock bag for future use. Frozen gyoza will cook in 3-5 minutes!
  7. To serve, melt about 15 g of unsalted butter with 30 mL of grapeseed oil and fry one side of each gyoza. Serve sprinkled with sesame seeds and bits of cilantro.

Serve these tasty treats with a sweet and salty soy sauce.

Read Full Post »

Back in October, we were seeing friends more than usual as we were going to spend the month of November in Arizona; there is always a feeling of urgency to see our peeps just before we go away for a significant period of time. For one such get-together, I finally baked a Basque Cheesecake! I say finally because it’s been on my list for years! I chose the Serious Eats recipe because it was in grams and easy to half as I only needed about half of the size.

Basque Cheesecake

For the original recipe, please click here. This recipe makes one 23 cm (8 inch) cheese cake.

Ingredients:

  • 450 g full-fat cream cheese, brought to 21°C
  • 135 g and 15g sugar, divided
  • 137.5 g egg (~3 whole eggs)
  • 15 g egg yolk (~1 yolk)
  • 115 g heavy cream
  • 10 g all-purpose flour
  • 5 g vanilla extract
  • 1.5 g salt
  • 2 g lemon zest, finely grated

Directions:

  1. Prep the pan by lining it with 2 square sheets of parchment paper (see notes).
  2. In the bowl of your stand mixer, combine the cream cheese and 135 g of sugar and beat with the paddle attachment, scraping the sides frequently, until there are no more lumps and the sugar has dissolved (3-4 minutes).
  3. Add the eggs one at a time, beating for about 10 second on each addition, scraping the sides of the bowl between additions.
  4. Add the remaining ingredients and beat until smooth.
  5. Pour the batter into the prepared parchment-lined pan and refrigerate for 30 minutes to one hour.
  6. Pre-heat the oven to 425° F with the oven rack in the middle.
  7. Remove the cake pan from the refrigerator and set on a rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle the remaining 15 g of sugar over the top of the pan and bake until the cheesecake is lightly browned on top.
  8. Increase the temperature to 450° and bake until the top is darker brown without burning (see notes). The cheesecake will be done when centre registers between 150° F and 155° F (65.5° C to 68° C). Or when the centre only jiggles a little bit.
  9. Allow the cheesecake to cool at room temperature for at least 4 hours. To remove from the pan, use the overhang of the parchment to pull the cheesecake straight out and set on an even surface, remove the parchment carefully, prying it away gently or with a small knife. Serve at room temperature or store in the fridge for no more than 3 days, covered to avoid it drying out.

This is a super-rich cheesecake that really doesn’t need any accompaniments.

Notes:

  • The easiest way to line a round pan with parchment is to thoroughly wet the parchment and wring it out. Now press it into the round pan, leaving the excess to overlap the rim of the pan. Set it in a warm oven to dry out (doesn’t have to be 100% dry, just dry enough so that the batter doesn’t stick to it). Cool completely. If you have two same-sized pans, you can insert the second one into the parchment-lined pan to push the parchment into the edges.
  • Your baking temperature may need to be reduced, on my first attempt, the timing in the original recipe was off because and I burnt the cheesecake. I reduced the temperatures to suit my oven.
  • You really don’t need a spring-form pan to make this cake, the parchment does all the work.

Read Full Post »

Canadian Thanksgiving was October 10th, about a month earlier than American Thanksgiving. We do everything pretty much the same as Americans, except that we are not as much into American football. Thanksgiving to Canadians means family getting together and enjoying the company, the food, and the gorgeous fall colours, not so much sports. This year was a quiet Thanksgiving because we usually celebrate with my cousins’ family but my cousin and her hubby were in Europe so we only had the adult kiddos over for dinner. We love cranberry like the next guy but I always seem to have a tonne left over as I did this year. So I decided to reinvent them into Liz’s dreamy Crumble Bars. JT is in charge of making the cranberry sauce and he usually only adds about half the sugar on the package recipe but since the kids were coming over, I asked him to make it a bit sweeter so he used 3/4 of the recommended sugar. The sauce was still reasonably tart which made it a perfect topping for these sweet pastry bars. I dare say, one of my favourites. So if you have cranberry sauce left over, give these a try, you won’t be disappointed.

Cranberry Crumble Bars

Makes one 22 cm x 33 cm (9″ x 13″) pan

Ingredients:

  • 250 g unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 100 g sugar
  • 100 g powdered sugar
  • 5 mL vanilla
  • 2.5 mL almond extract
  • 280 g flour
  • 8 g salt
  • 150 mL homemade cranberry sauce

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350° F. Prepare a 23″ x 33″ cm (9″ x 13″) pan by lining with parchment.
  2. Cream the butter with the sugars until fluffy. Beat in the vanilla and the almond extract.
  3. Beat in the flour and salt on low speed until entirely incorporated.
  4. Portion about 2/3 of the flour mixture into the bottom of the pan and press evenly to all sides. Bake for 20 minutes. Refrigerate the remaining pastry.
  5. After you have baked the base pastry, pour the cranberry jam onto the base and spread evenly with an offset spatula. Crumble the remaining pastry onto the top, being careful not to cover it entirely.
  6. Bake for an additional 25-30 minutes or until the topping is golden.
  7. Allow to cool completely and cut into squares or bars.

 

Notes:

  • Jellied canned cranberry sauce may be too runny to work in this recipe, you definitely want sauce with fruit in it.

Read Full Post »

In early October, JT and a friend went to Buffalo to see a hockey game (hockey is absurdly expensive in Toronto and it was a nice male bonding trip). I had a friend over for dinner and I served mussels. I had about 12 left over and thought I’d like to try this Spanish recipe to preserve mussels. They turned out quite delicious so next time I’m at the Fish Monger, I will get a bag to make a batch of these tasty treats.

While the cooked mussels have a soft and spongy texture, the preserved mussels are much meatier to the bite, which makes them a bit more filling and not unpleasant at all.

Interestingly enough, I did not see these on any menu while we were in Spain, or maybe I didn’t notice them. When we are in Spain again, I will definitely search them out because they are tasty.

I may have tasted one to be sure they were worth blogging about.

Mussels Escabeche

For the original recipe, please click here.

Ingredients:

  • 50 g mussels, cooked (shells reserved)
  • 30 mL high-quality extra-virgin olive oil
  • 5 g roasted garlic puree
  • pinch of rosemary
  • pinch of thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/4 cinnamon stick
  • 2 or 3 whole black peppercorns
  • Peeled zest of 1/4 a lemon, cut into thin strips
  • 1/4 teaspoon sweet paprika
  • 30 mL white wine vinegar
  • pinch of salt

Directions:

  1. Clean and dry the shells and set them aside.
  2. In a small saucepan, combine the olive oil, garlic, rosemary, thyme, bay leaves, cinnamon, black pepper, and lemon peel and heat gently to a very low boil for about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and add the paprika, vinegar, and salt and stir well.
  3. Put the mussels into a clean glass jar and top with the warm liquid with all of the spices. Stir well. Put a lid on the jar and set it in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 days.
  4. To serve, remove the mussels from the marinade making sure there are no little bits sticking to them.
  5. Strain the marinade. Add one mussel to a half shell and drizzle with a little of the oil mixture. Serve cool.

Notes:

  • My summer herb garden finally gave into winter so I’m using dried herbs for this recipe. The slow cooking will bring their flavour out into the marinade but fresh is preferred.
  • I reduced this recipe to cover the few leftover mussels I had.
  • I garnished my mussels with sliced scallions and diced pickled hot peppers.

 

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: