Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘spices’

ChaiTiramisu_First

We had good friends over for dinner recently and I made an Indian extravaganza (all posted recipes but I’ll repeat them below). I wanted something a little different because I’d already made Chai Crème Brûlée and Gulab Jamun. I’ve always wanted to bake Lady Fingers and that’s how I landed on Chai Tiramisu. We feasted on the Indian food and then retired to the living room to enjoy the wood fire and dessert; our guests must have enjoyed the dessert because after they’d decided they had had enough and rested the half-eaten plates on the coffee table, they kept picking them up for ‘just one more bite’, eventually finishing off the entire plate. Now THAT makes me happy.

It’s not overly sweet and the chai comes through from the chai liquor soaked lady fingers. The ricotta and Greek yogurt combo makes it slightly less rich than the mascarpone version which was good considering the heaviness of the meal; I would definitely make it again even with the home-made ladyfingers, but if you’re tight for time, the store bought Italian ladyfingers would certainly do the trick.

Chai Tiramisu and Homemade Ladyfingers

Makes approx 1 loaf pan 23 cm x 13 cm  (9″ x 5″) tiramisu.

ChaiTiramisu_7636

Placing the tiramisu in the freezer for one hour before serving guarantees perfect slices.

Lady Fingers

Makes about 36 small lady fingers

Roughly based my recipe on this recipe, but I reduced volumes and I changed the method for egg whites

Ingredients Ladyfingers:

  • 2 eggs, room temperature, separated
  • 4 tbsp sugar, divided
  • 1/2 tsp bourbon vanilla extract
  • pinch of cream of tartar
  • 42 g cake and pastry flour, sifted

Directions Ladyfingers:

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 350° F (176° C). Generously butter and flour a lady finger molded tray or a cookie sheet.
  2. Beat egg whites with 2 tbsp sugar and cream of tartar until stiff peaks form, set aside.
  3. Beat egg yolks with remaining 2 tbsp sugar and vanilla extract until pale in colour but not ribbons.
  4. Gently fold in the egg whites being careful not to deflate. Carefully sift the flour into the egg mixture and fold even more carefully so as not to deflate but making sure all the flour is well incorporated.
  5. Using a lady finger molded baking tray, or piping the batter into long fingers
  6. Bake for 12 minutes, allow to cool completely in pan and gently coax out to remove.
LadyfingerPan_7618

Butter generously and then dust with flour. Don’t take the non-stick spray shortcut, it doesn’t work!

Ingredients for Chai liquor (see note):

  • 1/3 cup of milk
  • 2 short cinnamon sticks
  • 2 star anise
  • 3 green cardamom pods
  • 8-10 cloves
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 5 cm fresh vanilla bean
  • 1 black tea bag
  • 1 tsp Pastis (or any anise flavoured liquor such as Ouzo or Anisette)

Directions for Chai liquor:

  1. Add milk and all of the spices except the vanilla bean to a small saucepan and stir well.
  2. Scrape seeds out of the vanilla bean and add both bean and seeds to the saucepan. Heat slowly to infuse the milk with the chai flavours, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Allow to cool, strain through a coarse sieve to allow vanilla seeds to remain in infused milk. Stir in Pastis. Set aside for assembly.

Ingredients for the Ricotta Cream and Chai Sugar:

  • 1 1/2 cups ricotta cheese (See note)
  • 3/4 cup Greek yogurt
  • 1/2 tsp orange zest
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 3 tbsp icing sugar, divided
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp cloves
  • 1/8 tsp cardamon
  • 1 tsp cocoa
  • 1/4 cup, roughly chopped pistachios, toasted

Directions for the Cream and Chai Sugar:

  1. Combine ricotta, yogurt, orange rind and 2 tbsp icing sugar and whip until fluffy.
  2. Combine 1 tbsp icing sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamon and cocoa and mix well.

Directions for Assembly:

  1. Line a small loaf pan with parchment paper.
  2. Dip each end of the ladyfingers into the chai liquor and line the loaf pan with them. Spread one third of the cream mixture over top, sprinkle with the chai sugar. Repeat 2 more times.
  3. Refrigerate overnight. About 90 minutes before serving, place in the freezer for so it’s easy to slice. Remove after 1 hour and slice into portions. Sprinkle some of the chai sugar on each plate, carefully place each slice in the centre of the plate, allow to sit for 30 minutes so it’s not overly cold. Serve with sprinkled pistachios.

Notes:

  • On using ricotta over mascarpone: I chose ricotta for two reasons, first is calories, this dessert made with ricotta is less than half the calories than using the richer mascarpone and two is budget, for some bizarre reason, mascarpone was $15 for about the same size of a $4 ricotta tub.
  • Feel free to use a chai tea bag to infuse the milk and omit all of the other spices, although I would still add the vanilla bean and seeds and the Anise liquor. Do not squeeze the tea bag otherwise you will have bitter chai liquor.
  • This dessert is best if it sits overnight in the fridge.
  • Although it is tempting to spray the ladyfinger pan with a non-stick spray, it will NOT WORK. Butter it generously and dust with flour. Each pan must be washed and rebuttered.

ChaiTiramisu_7635

The lady fingers soak up the Chai Liquor so they are pillowy soft.

Previous Posts about Indian Food:
Palek Paneer

Also known as Saag Paneer

Also known as Saag Paneer

Carrot Pickle and Mango Chutney

Lightly crunchy and packed full of flavour

Lightly crunchy and packed full of flavour

Sweet and tangy, just like a chutney should be

Sweet and tangy, just like a chutney should be

Best Naan Ever

Chewy and crispy at the same time

Chewy and crispy at the same time

Aloo Papri Chat

A quick shot of the actual serving dish at the dinner party

A quick shot of the actual serving dish at the dinner party

Beef Buhna

Tender beef cubes drenched in a mildly spicy, fragrant, flavourful gravy

Tender beef cubes drenched in a mildly spicy, fragrant, flavourful gravy

Paneer Makhani

A delicious, rich tasting tomato gravy with gently firm paneer

A delicious, rich tasting tomato gravy with gently firm paneer

Baked Onion Bahjis

Don't be fooled by their size, they pack a big punch of flavour

Don’t be fooled by their size, they pack a big punch of flavour

Jamie Olivers Chicken Tikka Masala (by far our favourite Indian Recipe)

ChickenTikkaMasala2_Blog

Chai Crème Brûlée

ChaiCremeBrulee_1925

Lemon Lentil Soup

Lemon Lentil Soup_1337

Tamarind Chutney

Tangy, sour and sweet all at once.

Tangy, sour and sweet all at once.

Enhanced Mulligatawny Soup

Enhanced Mulligatawny Soup

Enhanced Mulligatawny Soup

Gulab Jamun

Gulab Jamun

Gulab Jamun

Matar Paneer

matarpaneer

Read Full Post »

We had a great sleep! And no ill effects from the jet lag…yet!
The first thing we needed to do is change our Travelers cheques to cash. Both trip advisor and a recently published book on Morocco said ‘everyone’ does this ‘everywhere’. You must see where I am going with this? Read NO ONE, NO WHERE. No bank, no exchange bureau, no where! They LIED! One more spot, the last one, a credit bureau; no the girl clerk does NOT do this, but that hotel on the corner does! So we go there, and low and behold, they DO! And it was not a rip-off, they were quite pleasant and reasonable. We met our Berber Souk tour guide there; a nice gentleman about my age born to a Berber Mom and an Arab Dad. He generously guided us through the souk highlighting areas we might have interest in, of course stopping at the ‘non-touristy’ honest shops (likely where he gets commission). Non-the-less a good experience. The shops expect bartering, which I love! And we did end up buying some Morrican saffron, cinnamon, cumin and a Moroccan spice mix.
This is our lunch place.

20111104-114125.jpg
He took us through the mazes of the souks for about two and a half hours. So nice. I did end up also buying a leather purse and a very cool fossil for my nephew (a disgusting bug, he will love it!).
The afternoon we booked a cooking course with our Riad; we were to be guided through the market to buy the food we will cook. Sadly the weather turned viscous and the winds were atrocious, so we turned back, but the cooking lesson prevailed! Our gracious translator Said Hayat and our wonderful Chef took us through the next two hours of traditional Moroccan cooking. Forget about that instant couscous, we made real couscous that took an hour, with our hands! So cool (actually, it was pretty hot!). We made Shrimp Briouat, (we will biy their actual cookbook and will remake the entire dinner in Toronto on our return for Barb and Kevin!) Chicken Tangine and Stewed Lamb (minus the lamb for Kevin!). We made grapefruit brûlée and apple tart tatin. And then we had it ALL for dinner! Our hosts were amazing! We had such a great time. It’s a must do in Marrakech! Here are some photos of our first culinary adventure!

20111104-181614.jpg

20111104-181637.jpg

20111104-181659.jpg
A traditional flavour base in Moroccan cooking is called smen it’s a very pungent, cheesy smelling butter. Think fish sauce in Thai cooking – its a flavour base!
Tomorrow we have hired a guide to takes us to the Atlas mountains! Bon nuits mes amis! (it’s all coming back to me now!)

Read Full Post »

As you may know, we renovated our kitchen about four years ago, adding about 100 square feet to our modest little 10′ x10′ craftsman-style kitchen and basement. Most renovations don’t go exactly to plan, and our’s was no different. I had hoped to gain an olive oil and vinegar drawer beside the stove and a great spice pullout on the other side, but because we have some angles on our main wall with most of the cabinets, we were limited (it makes for an interesting layout, but awkward functionality). I did manage both of my wishes, but we had to be creative on where we put them.
For years I managed with my spices being in small labelled tins, but a tablespoon of this or that would deplete my tin, so I was constantly refilling. Last fall, we were visiting our good friends Paul and T in Yorkville Illinois and I noticed that she had some lovely little jars of spices she had picked up in Target (we Canadians say Tarjé, as in French!). Much to my surprise, she generously picked up an entire set for me! What a dear, dear friend.
They didn’t have some of the unique spices I like to have on hand (such as garam masala, meat masala or five Chinese spice) so I relabeled some duplicates, which worked out perfectly! Now my spice drawer is complete! I’m wondering what my next project should be?

20111020-061744.jpg
Yes, I may have ‘type-A’ tendencies! The spices are organized alphabetically! It’s not crazy, just super organized! No, really!

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: