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Archive for the ‘Vegetarian’ Category

Recently, we spent the weekend in Niagara-on-the-Lake with dear friends. It’s not the first time we been to NOTL, but it’s the first time we spent a summer weekend there. It’s usually ridiculously expensive because it is tourist season but we found some lovely rooms above an Irish pub that’s one street away from the beaten path. The rooms are reasonably priced, a good size AND they give you two $25 gift cards for the bar! What a deal! The humidity had broken and the temperatures were manageable, it really was a lovely weekend. We ate a picnic lunch and then rented bikes for an hour or so along the bike path along side the Niagara parkway. If you’re ever down this way, I urge you to take a moment and enjoy the ride! Although I would strongly recommend you buy your picnic lunch elsewhere as the grocery store in town is ridiculously expensive!

I wish I had taken some of this silky, creamy orange gelato as it would have made a refreshing treat after the sunny ride!

Silky, Creamy Orange Gelato

For the original recipe, please click here.

This recipe makes about 500 mL gelato.

Ingredients:

  • 200 mL fresh orange juice (from about 3 good-sized oranges)
  • 45 mL fresh lemon juice
  • 200 g granulated sugar
  • 500 mL milk
  • 30 g skim milk powder
  • Pinch of salt

Directions:

  1. Combine everything in a blender and blend until smooth.
  2. Pour into your frozen ice cream maker pot and turn on. Run as per manufacturer’s instructions (mine took about 35 minutes).

We are having a heat wave right now, so it’s a bit of a challenge keeping the gelato frozen. Yep, it’s that hot!

I also made lemon gelato which turned out exceptionally well, but, I forgot to take a photo because we took it to friends for dessert! I would have to say that the lemon was my personal favourite.

Dreamy, Creamy Lemon Gelato

This recipe makes about 500 mL gelato

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup fresh Lemon Juice (from about 5 good-sized lemons)
  • zest of 1 lemon, very fine
  • 200 g granulated sugar
  • 250 mL skim milk
  • 250 mL heavy cream
  • 10 g skim milk powder
  • Pinch of salt

Directions:

  1. Combine everything in a blender and blend until smooth.
  2. Pour into your frozen ice cream maker pot and turn on. Mine took about 35 minutes to a very creamy consistency, it will not freeze rock hard.

Notes:

  • The lemon gelato was a lot creamier than the orange version because of the 35% cream, and although I prefer less rich things, I think this is worth the splurge.
  • The lemon gelato did not freeze solid, whereas the orange did so I had to leave it out for a few minutes to serve.
  • I did add orange zest into the orange gelato but found it made it a touch bitter, so I adjusted the recipe. If you like bitter, try 5 g or less.

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I was instantly smitten with my dear friend Lorraine’s Fig and Sour Cream Custard Tart, the gorgeous figs and stone fruit offset by the luscious golden custard, I knew I had to make it right away. Fortunately, my best friend from university, Kimberley and her husband were coming for brunch a few days after I saw the post so (after I checked that she was OK with spelt flour) I made this romantic tart! Thank you, Lorraine, for the inspiration ❤️♥️!

I always like to reduce the fat as much as possible so I used Sklar, the incredibly thick Icelandic yogurt instead of full-fat sour cream. It has a similar piquant flavour and it does not have pectin to thicken it. It is high in protein, fat-free and lactose-free so it’s a win/win.

Icelandic Yogurt Custard Tart

Makes 1 23 cm tart (about 8 slices)

For the original recipe, please click here.

To print this recipe, please click here.

Ingredients for the tart base:

  • 100 g unsalted butter
  • 180 g spelt flour
  • 15 g sugar
  • 2 g salt
  • 60-90 mL cold water

Ingredients for the Icelandic Yogurt Custard:

  • 3 eggs, room temperature
  • 1 egg yolk (use part of this yolk for the crust)
  • 300 g plain Icelandic yogurt (I used this brand)
  • 170 g caster sugar
  • 15 mL  lemon juice
  • 5 mL vanilla

Directions:

  1. Combine all of the tart base ingredients except the water in the bowl of your food processor. Pulse until it resembles coarse sand. Slowly add the cold water until the dough comes together. Create a disk and wrap in plastic wrap and rest for 1 hour, or if your kitchen is warm, in the fridge for 30 minutes.
  2. Pre-heat the oven to 400° F.
  3. Roll out the dough to about 2 mm thickness and press into a 23 cm tart pan. Decorate with remaining dough or just leave plain. I decorated with the remaining dough and still had enough to make two much smaller, personalized tarts.
  4. Bake the tart shells for 20 minutes then reduce the oven temperature to 250° F. Wrap the bottom of the tart pans in foil paper and set into a roasting pan with 4 cm sides.
  5. Whisk the custard ingredients together until smooth.
  6. Pour the custard mixture into each shell. Carefully pour enough water into the roasting pan to come up about 1-1.5 cm on the side and bake for an additional 30 minutes or until set. If the edges are browning too quickly, lay pieces of foil paper around the perimeter.
  7. Allow to cool and decorate with figs, sugar prunes, kiwi fruit and blueberries.

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You caught me: I made hot cross buns at Easter while we were visiting our friends in Arizona but sadly their pantry did not contain icing sugar, so I was forced to skip the “cross” on the buns. They were exceptionally tasty (even without the icing cross), flavoured with warming spices and some rum-soaked currents.

Hot Cross-less Buns

For the original recipe, please click here.

To print this recipe, please click here.

This recipe makes 12 large, soft, pillowy buns.

Ingredients:

  • 125 mL rum
  • 100 g dried currants
  • 375 mL milk, room temperature
  • 2 large eggs, plus 1 egg yolk (save the white for the topping)
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 53 g light brown sugar, firmly packed
  • 550-600 g Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground cloves or allspice
  • 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1 3/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • 85 g butter, room temperature
  • 15 mL milk

Directions:

  1. Soak the currents in the rum for about 20 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, combine the milk, eggs, yeast, brown sugar and whisk to combine. In the large bowl of your stand mixer, combine the flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt and baking powder, whisk to combine.
  3. Add the softened butter to the flour mixture and mix until the butter is well combined (you may also do this with your fingers). Add the liquid ingredients to the flour mixture and beat until a soft dough has formed (if it is too soft, add a bit more flour to it and beat). Meanwhile, strain the currents and add them to the dough and beat well. This is a very soft and sticky dough.
  4. Place in a well-greased bowl and allow to proof for 1 hour or until doubled in size.
  5. Prepare a large, high sided baking pan by buttering the base and all sides.
  6. When the dough has doubled in size, make about 112 g balls out of them. Place in the prepared pan and allow to rest with a clean cloth covering it for 1 hour.
  7. Pre-heat the oven to 375° F.
  8. Combine the left-over egg white with 15 mL milk and beat well. Brush the tops of the rolls with the mixture. Bake for 20 minutes or until the internal temperature reads 190° F. Allow to cool slightly before serving.

Fresh out of the oven, these pillowy-soft buns are fragrant and delicious.

Notes:

  • The original recipe called for 50% more currents but I felt it was a little too much so I reduced it.
  • My dough was quite soft and sticky with the originally called-for flour, so I added a bit more flour.
  • The original recipe wanted the leftover rum to be incorporated into the dough, but my dough was already too soft and sticky so I skipped it.
  • This tip from King Arthur flour sounds quite interesting and I will try it next time I make this tasty recipe:
    “Want to make these buns a day or so ahead of time? Try the tangzhong technique, a Japanese method for increasing the softness and shelf life of yeast rolls. Begin by measuring out the flour and milk you’ll be using in the recipe. Now take 3 tablespoons of the measured flour and 1/2 cup of the measured milk; put them in a saucepan set over medium-high heat. Cook the mixture, whisking constantly, until it thickens and forms a thick slurry; this will take about 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 minutes. Transfer the cooked mixture to a bowl, let it cool to lukewarm, then combine it with the remaining flour, milk, and other dough ingredients. Proceed with the recipe as directed. Well-wrapped and stored at room temperature, your finished hot cross buns should stay soft and fresh for several days.”

Would you care to try one?

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In the Spring edition of the LCBO’s (our liquor store) Food & Drink magazine, they featured a Turmeric, Miso & Ginger Soup that immediately caught my attention. In mid-March, we were still craving soups, believe it or not, so I thought I’d give this colourful soup a go in my humble kitchen. The flavours were earthy, brightened by the lemon juice and sweetened by the peas and corn, everything one could want from the spring soup.

An Earthy soup to warm and ward off any spring colds.

Turmeric, Ginger, Miso Soup with Peas and Corn

Makes 1 L soup

For the original recipe, please click here.

To print this recipe, please click here.

Ingredients:

  • 15 mL EVOO
  • 70 g sweet onion (such as Vidalia), finely chopped
  • 50 g celery, sliced
  • 1 L vegetable stock, divided
  • 20 g ginger, roughly chopped
  • 2 g garlic, roughly chopped
  • 5 g turmeric powder
  • 20 g white miso
  • 15 mL freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 70 g each, frozen peas and frozen corn

Directions:

  1. In a medium stock-pot, heat the olive oil and add the chopped onion and cook until translucent. Add the celery and cook for a minute or so longer.
  2. In a small measuring cup fitted for your stick blender, add about 125 mL vegetable stock, the ginger, garlic, turmeric and miso and blend until smooth.
  3. Add the turmeric mixture to the celery and onions and cook for a few minutes, until you can smell the garlic. Add the remainder of the vegetable stock and lemon juice and bring to a boil. Add the frozen peas and corn and stir for a minute.
  4. Serve hot.

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Recently I purchased too many strawberries because they were 3 packages for three dollars! We ate most of them, but I had one package left over that I needed to do something with. My dear cousin and her family were scheduled to come for dinner and they had requested vanilla ice cream for dessert so I decided to make a strawberry sauce as a garnish; who doesn’t love home-made strawberry sauce?

Strawberry Sauce

A KitchenInspirations Original Recipe

Makes 300 mL

To print the recipe, please click here.

Ingredients:

  • 340 g strawberries, hulled and roughly chopped
  • 47 g coconut sugar
  • 3 mL freshly squeezed lemon juice

Directions:

  1. Stir the ingredients together in a heavy saucepan. Cook over medium heat until sugar dissolves, then bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and simmer for 3 minutes.
  2. Lightly blend with an immersion blender, leaving some bits. Cool. Refrigerate or freeze until required, bring to room temperature before use.

A quick and easy recipe if you have too many strawberries.

The bits of strawberries in this sauce, sets it apart from the store-bought strawberry sauces.

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Many years ago, I made a hummus soup that was so luxurious and flavourful that it felt decadent, but it wasn’t! It was all the bright flavours of typical hummus with fewer calories and fat. You already know that I love using lentils for quick and flavourful soups and sauces so this recipe will come as no surprise. It can be made as thick or as thin as you choose. I used roasted garlic instead of fresh garlic to tone down the garlic hit but also provide a beautiful nutty background flavour. I also added freshly grated turmeric, which is not in traditional hummus but added a lovely earthy tone.

Lentil Hummus Soup

Makes about 1 L, but it depends on how thick you make the soup.

A KitchenInspirations Original Recipe

To print recipe, please click here..

Ingredients:

  • 120 g red lentils
  • 375 mL vegetable stock, or to taste
  • 50 g tahini (or natural peanut butter)
  • 20 g roasted garlic
  • 10 g turmeric, freshly grated
  • 4 g toasted cumin
  • 15 mL lemon juice
  • 50 mL olive oil
  • sea salt, to taste
  • 10 g feta, per serving, for crumbling

Directions:

  1. Cook the lentils in the vegetable stock until very soft. Add the tahini, garlic, turmeric, cumin and lemon juice and stir well until the tahini has melted into the soup.
  2. Transfer to a glass stick blender container and blend until very smooth, adding more stock if you see necessary. Slowly drizzle in the olive oil as you are blending. Season to taste.
  3. Serve hot garnished with crumbled feta cheese.

A deliciously velvety hummus-style soup.

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We have been really enjoying Korean cuisine for a while now, and my dear friend Barb (Profiteroles and Ponytails, in hiatus) gave us a wonderful jar of gourmet Kimchi for Christmas. The first time I ever tried Kimchi was in Paris with my friend Charles (Five Euro Foods, also in hiatus) when he took us to a Korean BBQ place. It was a delicious lunch filled with bright and heady flavours but I have to tell you that I did not love my first experience with Kimchi. Fortunately, since then, I have tried many different versions and I am very happy to report, I LOVE IT! My friend Sissi over at With a Glass is the Kimchi expert, she has made several versions and recipes using Kimchi, check out her lovely blog. In fact, it was the persistence of Sissi’s recipes on her blog that made me want to make my own, plus that jar that Barb so generously gave us was awesome and I wanted more! Thank you, Sissi and Barb.

The recipes are as easy as they sound, the most difficult part will be the waiting until it ferments and then dig in. It works well with Korean but we’ve also had it with Indian and it is wonderful. This makes a smallish batch but it is enough for a few meals.

Kimchi

Please click here for original recipe.

To print recipe, click here.

Makes 1 650 mL jar

Ingredients:

  • 450 g chopped and grated vegetables (see notes)
  • 75 g table salt
  • water to cover
  • 20 g ginger, grated
  • 16 g garlic, grated
  • 6 g Korean red pepper
  • 13 g sugar
  • 30 mL fish sauce (or 45 mL, to taste)

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, add the coleslaw mix (minus the celeriac). Pour the salt over the entire mix and rub in with your hands. Cover with water. Allow to sit at room temperature for 12-24 hours, stirring occasionally.
  2. Rince the salted coleslaw mix 4-5 times with fresh water. Add the green onions and celeriac and mix thoroughly.
  3. In a small glass bowl, combine the ginger, garlic, red pepper sugar and fish sauce and mix well to create a smooth paste. Pour over the coleslaw mix.
  4. Using a gloved hand, rub the paste into the slaw until it is fully incorporated and evenly mixed. Pack the entire slaw mix into a sterilized jar, pressing down to remove large air bubbles, leaving about 2.5 cm space at the top, then cap with the lid. Allow to ferment for 2-3 days in a cool spot but not the refrigerator. It’s probably a good idea to open the jar every-so-often to release the gases that build up during fermentation. Once it has reached your desired flavour, refrigerate. Some recipes need to sit in the refrigerator for a couple of weeks but this one you may use right away, knowing that the flavours will only get better as it ages.

Notes:

  • Buying an entire cabbage is far too much for just the two of us, it would take us a year to go through it all, so I buy the pre-shredded coleslaw mix in the bag salad section and augment it with what I have at home, this time it was celeriac and green onions.
  • I would use gloves to massage the paste into the vegetables, the red pepper may stain your hands and nails.

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